Sshhh…The folding single barrel .410

The folding single barrel .410 shotgun, I know I have mentioned them before. Normal rules apply with these things if you are in the UK. Is it safe to shoot and equally as importantly, can you legally own it on your shotgun certificate? I say this because so many of these things hover around 24″ barrel length and to comply with our UK firearms law the barrel must be 24″ or greater, not 600,0mm or longer and not 60cm or longer. 24″

OK, so you own one, it is safe to shoot and lawful to own so what can you do with it? Well shoot it of course! Beware as they are usually 2.5″ chamber or less so do not go stuffing 3″ 17 gram loads in it, however as a fun gun for rabbits or barn pigeons and clays of course, they are great.

But what about if it has a barrel less than 24″ in length? Well now it is classed as a Section 1 firearm and needs to be held accordingly.

You can always do something useful with one though. This one came in on a Section 2 shotgun certificate and careful measuring from the breech face to the end of the barrel put it right on the raggedy edge of Section 2. We advertised it for a while however we had no takers so it was left in the Armoury, awaiting a decision. As much as I do like these things I cannot keep every gun that comes in. They are either sold or used, not left in the corner of a cabinet.

Now I have to deal with animals involved in RTA’s (Road Traffic Accidents) I prefer to use a .410 shotgun as they are quick and humane, however walking through a housing estate with a gun over one shoulder in a high visibility vest does draw attention so I decided to haul the .410 out and do something with it.

The plan was to fit a permanently attached sound moderator that would not leave any doubt as to the length of the ‘Barrel’ plus it could be used for humane despatch. First job was to create a suitable sound moderator body and I opted for a cylinder from an Air Arms Carbine air rifle. They fill to 200 Bar (2900PSI) so more than adequate for the job and did a quick mock up to see how it felt and looked.

Nice, time to put the concept into practice.  I machined a threaded adapter that fitted nicely at the correct distance from the muzzle, fitted a muzzle cap to the new body and assembled everything on the gun. Everything still looked good, so the new threaded adapter was silver soldered onto the barrel and everything was pulled apart. I had already scrubbed the section of the barrel that would be inside the sound moderator, so I now drilled a series of 4,2mm holes at 30,0mm centres in 4 rows, offset by 15,0mm. Think of it as opposing holes every 30,0mm at Zero and 180 degrees and two more opposing rows at 90 and 270 degrees with these holes being centred between the other pair. The burrs were removed and the barrel blacked again by hand.

Onto the baffles. I had been mulling over many different ideas and ended up with aluminium mesh from Amazon. A sheet of mesh 3000x500mm costs under £14.00 (October 2020) and is enough for several goes.

As the outer tube is 300,0mm long externally, the mesh is around 250,0mm long. I cut it to length with scissors, then wrapped it tight to the barrel until it just fitted in to the tube and cut it to the length. I then wrapped the mesh back around the barrel and tried to assemble everything and failed as it was unwrapping itself from the barrel. So I wound it into a tube like a rolled up newspaper, pushed into the outer tube where it opened up slightly and allowed me to assemble everything with ease as the hole in the middle of the mesh was plenty big enough to allow easy assembly.

OK, so now I have a folding .410 shotgun that has a 2.5″ chamber and needs testing. Off to our designated test location we went and confirmed it was quite happy with the 2.5″ test loads. I also noted that it was incredibly quiet with a solitary test subsonic cartridge, however only 3″ subsonic cartridges are available here in the UK, so I was obviously going to have to make my own.

Back at the workshop I stripped everything down to clean and carefully inspect and was delighted to not see any signs of damage or pressure as I had expected. So I did some research on 2.5″ subsonic loads, realised the data was not really available so I ‘phoned a friend and he did the load development.

The load arrived upon used 2.5” Plastic case, Winchester 209 primers, Maxam CS5 powder, full size cork wad left untrimmed at 16mm, 16.7 grains #6 shot, a car wad and finished with a tight roll crimp.

So how does it shoot? Our sound meter tells me a supersonic factory 2.5″ 14 gram cartridge measured at 45 degrees back and at one meter is around 140 dB give or take a couple of dB. With the newly built subsonic loads we saw around typically 97-98 dB. This is with a load of 16,7 grams #6 shot and around 990fps. The load listed above uses no plastic components other than the case itself which can be reloaded several times.

I gave the case heads a wash with blue dye so I can clearly identify the subsonic loads.

What I will say is I strongly believe the sound reduction is down to the cartridges as much as the silencer and oddly, the tension on the crimp is as important as anything. Nick of NB Guns, who did the development tells me he did get some loads down to 700fps with no signs of over pressure so dependant on ambient temperature we can always slow/quieten things down a bit more if needed.

In practice, I can definitely hear the hammer drop at 90 degrees to the gun at 2m with our loads and I doubt you would really know what was going on from 25m away, which is about the length of a tennis court. Have I used it yet? Well I did shoot a clay with it the other day!

Final job was find something to put it in. We get many guns come in with old slips so I grabbed one from the pile, shortened it to suit, glued the end together with rubber adhesive and stitched it up. So now I can keep it safe and sound and pop it over my shoulder when needed.

Will I be building any more? Probably not. It was a design and build test as much as anything, it was intended to be built to a tight budget and hard cash outlay has been negligible. Instead it was mostly a spare time build, even the testing was added to an existing run out to test customer guns.

Will I be testing the gun with slug? Given the results I doubt I will take things any further. I have a lovely little gun that will serve the purpose it was built for, nothing more and nothing less.

Beretta Shotgun top lever servicing

It is game season and we had a 686 come in today with a top lever that would not return and the client is out this coming Thursday, so getting it back to him ASAP is a given.
 
In my experience, Beretta top lever springs seldom fail however they do wear along the edges along the same lines as the ejector springs. More likely it will be down to crud and dirt around the locking latch (Those bits that stick out and lock the barrel in when you close the gun. A strip, clean and lubricate usually suffices. What does not work so well is spraying everything with brake cleaner as it never truly gets into the working parts plus the latch release pin needs to come out to be cleaned. Better to spend a few minutes stripping everything down and do the job properly.
 
Anyway, it made me think. I am not sure when I last posted a picture of everything associated with the top lever assembly, or even mentioned it, so here is a picture. Fair to say I forgot to include the washer and screw from the assembly however you should get the idea. Followed by an image of the parts as they will sit. People tell me the top lever and locking latch are a pain to strip and re-assemble.
I reckon, excluding cleaning, it takes probably less than 90 seconds to remove and put things back together, all being well. Strip is a one man affair, an extra pair of hands is handy when putting things back together and I am really lucky to have the Viking, who acts as the assistant Gunsmith, plus she has younger eyes and and a quick mind so she tends to pick things up very quickly.
 
So there you go, a Beretta top lever and locking lugs on the bench, bet you don’t see that very often and yes, I know I missed out the dis-assembly and re-assembly process images, I will save those for another day 🙂
 
..and why am I telling you this? Because you need to know.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fitting and head spacing a barrel on a BSA International MkIII

The humble .22 BSA International target rifle, we have all shot or owned one and if not, hopefully you will one day.

This one is a MkIII with the floating barrel and it came in for a re-crown and re-time//head space the barrel. At some point the barrel had been twisted very slightly which was enough to cant the fore sight over, yet still operate correctly. The head space was also out. Now interestingly, there seems to be some mystique about these things and I remember reading on a forum quite recently that they were factory pressed together and could not be adjusted. OK, well here is one in bits on the counter so you can see how they come apart and the process is remarkably easy:

Drop the action parts out of the receiver and place them some where safe.

Remove the two knurled cap-head screws from the left hand side of the receiver, they are going to be tight so you have been warned!

Now pull the barrel out of the receiver, it might be quite a snug fit!

What I do is pop the barrelled actioned in the barrel vice (I use a 25000kg hydraulic press) I then flood the barrel tenon with Plus-Gas and make myself a coffee. I then attach my universal action wrench with masking tape or aluminium shims to protect the receiver.

Nip the wrench up very lightly, if you do it up tightly the receiver will tighten on the barrel tenon.

 

Now get hold of the action wrench and rotate/pull back and the receiver should detach from the barrel with a bit of effort.

I make my own wrenches and here are a couple of examples. They need to be robust as they do take a fair amount of abuse on occasions. The top one is the one I use most of the time for British Service rifles and the block with cut-out alongside is for SMLE rifles. Below is a wrench I mostly use for revolvers however it also does a good job on parallel sided receivers.

With luck, you should end up with something that looks a like the adjacent image.

Clean everything carefully and inspect, in this case it went into the lathe and was crowned.

OK, back in the vice, clock the front sight base to zero (Or use a precision level)

Now push the receiver onto the tenon and fit the two screws loosely, I usually nip them until the receiver will no longer rotate and back off a 1/4 turn. You should have a few degrees of rotation.

Fit the action internals ensuring everything has been thoroughly cleaned as we really do not need a piece of grit to mess up things right now.

Fit the GO head space gauge, push the receiver forward and ensure it is level, now nip the screws up and check everything. Did you fit the GO Gauge before fitting the receiver? Start again

Open the action keeping a hand over the load port or be prepared to spend an hour or so looking for your gauge.

Check with the NOGO and if all is good you can put the rifle back together.

One small detail, the fore end support is held in place by the front screw so you do have one last chance to mess things up, which, hopefully you will not.

So there you go, a BSA International MkIV stripped and head spaced.

…and why am I telling you this? Because you need to know.

Barrel fluting

We also flute barrels occasionally…

Fluting is one of those jobs that you just have to get on with. I would love to say we are currently fluting on a three axis CNC mill however we are not. Instead, we use a Bridgeport manual and either a dividing head or a rotary table, we have a variety of different ‘Turny-roundy-indexy’ sort of things in the workshop, however it is often down to what is on the machine.

On this occasion I used what was on the machine as it was already set up. This particular rotary table can be moved in two axis and currently wears a 4 jaw chuck with a collet block in it, so it was just a matter of set it to zero degrees and pop a collet in it.Incidentally, the writing on the table are notes from a previous job.

At the other end is a tail stock and with the barrel in place, the penultimate  job is to check everything is correctly setup across all axis and fit the support.

The support (Not shown) either supports the centre of the barrel from the back or bottom and is either an angle plate or a jacking plate dependant on if I am fluting from above with a carbide bull nosed cutter or to the side with a rotary cutter.

The customer had asked for 8x6mm flutes so bull  nose it was.

At this point it is a matter of setting the start point, feed speed and depth of cut and kicking the job off. The downside is it a messy job on a manual and very time consuming and this stainless barrel was fluted over an evening and the following morning.

I have fluted many barrels and handled many more and my pet hate is sharp edges on the flutes so I always take care to de-burr them, ideally they are then blasted and Cerakoted however this barrel was stainless and the customer preferred a self colour finish.

So there you are a heavy stainless  barrel fluted.

The technical bit:

8×6.0mm equispaced flutes cut to 3,0mm deep.

Length of cuts 330,0mm

Total weight saving 295 grams

Yes, we do stock Shotgun Cartridges

People often ask if we stock shotgun cartridges, probably because we tend to not advertise the fact, so here is a quick mention.

Yes, actually we do stock competitively priced cartridges for all purposes including Eley, Lyalvale, Fiocchi, Hull, Federal and RC in a range of sizes including .22 Shot, 9mm garden Gun, .410, 28 Bore, 20 Bore, 16 Bore and 12 Bore. In a range of shot sizes and cartridge lengths with fibre and plastic wads. We also hold a range of box ends and oldies.

Please note, we only stock fibre wadded game cartridges and will not support the use of plastic wads over land.

So there you go, a good range of cartridges available within the Lincolnshire Wolds and remember, we are shooters so you can always ask if you are not sure of what to opt for. After all, we love helping you spending your money!